BONNIE HANSEN DESIGN

The Goal

Combine the business lines of AHF into a single website for their entire user base. Completely redo the information architecture and redesign the site to be clean, organized, and reduce cognitive load, while maintaining the well established and respected brand.

Summary

The AIDS Healthcare Foundation's online presence developed organically over the course of many years, causing natural disorganization. This project was put together to help users get the information and services they need with less confusion and frustration.

My Role

UX Research & Design

Complex Web Presence Unification:

AIDS Healthcare Foundation

June - Sept 2020

Step One

Evaluating the current network

Upon taking a look at the many existing AHF websites, some problems became immediately apparent:

  • There were many different styles of headers, footers, and general branding

  • There was content redundancy across many of the sites

  • Patients had no agency to manage care

  • There was confusion as to which site was the "main site"


In order to better organize my thoughts, I made a chart of the current network of AHF sites.

In red are the primary targets for integration; in orange, secondary; in blue and green, patient related sites that could potentially be integrated; in grey, sites with independent management that had to remain separate. The arrows mark which site points to another-- many times, there are sites that are deeply buried and hard to find.

Step Two

Identifying key user groups

In combining the different network lines into a single entity, AHF wanted to address in combination their two most distinct user groups:

  1. Users who are seeking AHF health services

  2. Users who are seeking to contribute to AHF


Therefore, the site we designed would have to make the separation of these user groups and which sections are meant for which very clear.

Step Three

Competitive analysis

We looked at competitors in both the nonprofit area, to see how massive amounts of organization data are commonly presented, and competitors in health and insurance which had private portals for users.

Features we found that these competitors had in common were:

  • Comprehensive "about" sections on the organization itself

  • Health information (or the corresponding subject of the organization)

  • Goals and accomplishments

  • Affiliate lists

  • Accessibility menu

  • Multiple donation options

  • Events and locations

  • Volunteer sign up

  • Multiple methods of contact

  • Media

  • Portal for users that allowed agency and multiple actions


AHF already had many of these features, but they were organized oddly and inconsistently. Examining how other businesses organized these features was helpful in building the revised site map.

Step Four

Information architecture

Examining the different paths a user would need to take to accomplish the most common goals for an AHF user (eg; finding information on HIV, looking for a way to volunteer, or signing up for treatment), I designed a new site map that combined all of the most important features from the 12 websites targeted for integration into a single entity.

With only eight primary pages in the main site, four in the patient portal, and only three levels of navigation, any user journey would be much easier than in the previous network.

Step Five

Usability testing

Examining the different paths a user would need to take to accomplish the most common goals for an AHF user (eg; finding information on HIV, looking for a way to volunteer, or signing up for treatment), I designed a new site map that combined all of the most important features from the 12 websites targeted for integration into a single entity.

With only eight primary pages in the main site, four in the patient portal, and only three levels of navigation, any user journey would be much easier than in the previous network.

Step Six

Final designs

These templates for the AHF site include both desktop and mobile-optimized designs.  I left some sections in the templates blank to allow AHF to finish curating the proper content for the site. I also put together a package of assets and a web-specific style guide to aid the AHF developers in implementing these changes.

Next Steps

To make this site a reality, final content will continue to be curated, the other business lines that could lead users astray will be deleted, and the new site will be developed and launched.

 

Most importantly, I have advised AHF to continue inviting feedback from users and to always work to improve the experience for users and patients.

Results

The feedback from my immediate supervisors was extremely positive, especially considering I was an outsider looking in to capture the brand and content of AHF. They were excited about the new site map and mockups and told me that they anticipate approval from department heads to implement the site.

Thank you for reading!